Making Sense of Big Data and its Power

My journey through digital marketing

File:Big data cartoon t gregorius.jpg

Just about every move a person makes is collected as data. Paying with a rewards card, conducting online searches, and using social media are just a few of the ways in which data is collected about us everyday.

All of these sources feed what is called Big Data. According to Webopedia Big Data is “used to describe a massive volume of both structured and unstructured data that is so large that it’s difficult to process using traditional database and software techniques.”

What does this really mean and what is it used for?

Getting to know your customers better through data has many pay offs. Today we are going to focus on marketing and how this data is used to better target customers.

One of the most basic ways this data can be used is through customization. Once a team has enough data they can predict what messages or products a…

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5 technologies that will help big data cross the chasm

Gigaom

We’re on the cusp of a real turning point for big data. Its applications are becoming clearer, its tools are getting easier and its architectures are maturing in a hurry. It’s no longer just about log files, clickstreams and tweets. It’s not just about Hadoop and what’s possible (or not) with MapReduce.

With each passing day, big data is becoming more about creativity — if someone can think of an application, they can probably build it. That makes the concept of big data a lot more tangible and a lot more useful to a lot more companies, and it makes the market for big data a lot more lucrative.

Here are five technologies helping spur a shift in thinking from “Why would I want to use some technology that Yahoo built? And how?” to “We have problem that needs solving. Let’s find the right tool to solve it.”

Apache Spark

When it comes to open source big data projects, they don’t…

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Get ready for a quantum computing software company

Gigaom

The technology world might soon be welcoming its first quantum computing software vendor, an Australian systems-analysis firm called Aerospace Concepts. The company, which also has a U.S. presence in a Washington, D.C., technology incubator, has partnered with Lockheed Martin to perform applied research about complex systems analysis on Lockheed’s D-Wave Systems quantum computer.

What that means, Aerospace Concepts COO Michael Brett told me via email, is that the company wants to develop algorithms that can wade through the complexities of creating advanced systems and help determine designs that best balance the various inherent tradeoffs. “For example,” he wrote, “a satellite needs to trade power and capacity while minimizing mass, so what is the best combination of factors to improve design.”

Theoretically — because the technology is still very much in its early days –quantum computing is ideal for this type of optimization problem as well as for advanced machine learning tasks…

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IDC Predicts 2014 Will Be a Year of Escalation, Consolidation, and Innovation as the Transition to IT’s “3rd Platform” Accelerates

Storage CH Blog

International Data Corporation (IDC) today offered the first of its annual predictions for the coming year in the information and communications technology (ICT) industry. IDC’s predictions for 2014 were heavily influenced by the 3rd Platform, the industry’s emerging platform for growth and innovation built on the technology pillars of mobile computing, cloud services, big data and analytics, and social networking.

Read on here

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9 tech trends that will make someone billions of dollars next year

Financial Post | Business

2014 is right around the corner.

Most of us can look into our crystal balls and see that a handful of tech trends which became big in 2013 will probably get bigger next year: cloud computing, big data, the rise of tablets, the Internet of Things.

But market research firm IDC has gone one better by predicting how these trends will unfold next year — and generate billions of dollars.

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People and companies will spend $2.1 trillion on technology.

People and companies will spend $2.1 trillion on technology.

 

REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

Worldwide IT spending will grow 5% next year to $2.1 trillion, IDC says.

People and companies will buy smartphones and tablets, a market expected to grow by 15% over 2013. Companies will also beef up their data centers with new hardware that works better with mobile devices. They’ll need servers, storage, networks, software, and services.

The only thing they won’t be buying more of is…

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